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Specialist Travel Insurance for Depression

Here at Free Spirit, we can provide travel insurance cover for people with depression. While other insurers may keep their premiums low by not offering cover for people with mental illnesses, we will ensure you get the right cover to suit your needs for the right price!

What makes Free Spirit different to standard travel insurance policies?

The two main reasons are: we can cover you for cancellation before you travel and for emergency medical expenses whilst you are away, in respect of the medical conditions you have insured.

If you are unfortunate enough to require emergency medical treatment during your holiday due to your depression, Free Spirit can provide a minimum level of cover of £5 million pounds for any emergency medical costs which will give you the peace of mind protection – just in case!

Remember though – failing to insure your depression could leave you open to paying out for expensive medical treatment and hospital accommodation costs and these costs could be thousands of pounds.

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Family, friends and carers travelling with you may also be covered by Free Spirit, whether they have a pre-existing medical condition or not. If you had to cancel your holiday due to your depression, travelling companions on the same policy would also be covered which may not be the case if they had taken out a separate standard policy elsewhere.

What is depression?

The word depression is used to describe how we feel on an everyday basis and the personal feelings which can affect us from time to time. Feeling sad or fed up are normal reactions to experiences that are upsetting, stressful or difficult to deal with.

If you are affected by depression, the intense feelings you experience of persistent sadness, helplessness and hopelessness are also accompanied by physical effects such as sleeplessness, loss of energy and physical aches and pains.

Sometimes people may not realise how depressed they are, especially if they have been feeling the same for a long time, if they have been trying to cope with their depression by keeping themselves busy, or if their depressive symptoms are more physical than emotional.

Here is a list of the most common symptoms of depression. Most sufferers of depression may experience four or more of these symptoms for the majority of their daily lives.

  • Tiredness and loss of energy
  • Persistent sadness
  • Loss of self-confidence and self-esteem
  • Difficulty concentrating
  • Not being able to enjoy things that are usually pleasurable or interesting
  • Undue feelings of guilt or worthlessness
  • Feelings of helplessness and hopelessness
  • Sleeping problems – difficulties in getting off to sleep or waking up much earlier than usual
  • Avoiding other people, sometimes even your close friends
  • Finding it hard to function at work/college/school
  • Loss of appetite
  • Physical aches and pains

Travelling with depression

If you’re taking medication for depression, make sure that you have enough to last through your trip and a little bit more just case you are delayed on your return journey! It’s a good idea to write down the details of your medication in the event you need hospital treatment or they are lost in transit. Not all countries use the same brands of medicine, so having these details at hand will avoid any un-necessary delays.

Whether you’re away for two weeks or two months, having a routine can be beneficial and it makes taking care of yourself easier. A good starting point would be to find out where will you have breakfast and at least this will set you up for the rest of the day, even if you can’t decide later where to have dinner. If you have difficulty with your memory remember to write down local street names, focal points and your accommodation details in case you need to ask for directions. Routine doesn’t mean you have to do the same thing every single day, just don’t allow yourself to fall back into sleeping in each morning.

Holidays are for enjoying and having fun and this can be difficult to understand when you have depression. You may feel guilty for enjoying yourself or cross with yourself if you don’t understand the language but don’t let these feelings speak for your whole self and detract away from why you are travelling the world. These feelings are bound to happen and it wouldn’t be realistic to think they won’t but sometimes, it’s worth taking a few moments to stop, think about and digest new surroundings and sensations before your mind wonders and takes over.

Get a quote online or by telephone

Get a quote

Obtaining a quote couldn’t be easier, why not give us a try today! Free Spirit provides online medical screening and we will ask you some questions about your depression so that you get the cover you need:

  • Have you ever had a compulsory admission to hospital for treatment of depression?
  • How many hospital admissions have you had for this condition in the last 2 years?
  • Have you currently been advised to take any medication for this illness?
  • Have you been referred to or treated by a psychiatrist for depression?
  • Has depression ever caused you to cancel or cut short a planned trip?

Should you need to discuss your insurance needs in greater detail with our customer service team why not telephone us on 0800 170 7704 or if you have a question, the answer you need may be on our frequently asked questions page. Free Spirit are UK based and on hand to help you Monday to Friday 8am-6pm, closed Bank Holidays.

For full details of our travel insurance cover for depression, please read our Free Spirit policy wording or click here.




  • Testimonials

    I was very pleased with the service, the lady was most helpful and very pleasant and I felt very at ease with all the questions. I have now passed on …
    J. O’NeillLancashire
    To read reviews click here

  • Ask Mary

    Free Spirit Manager, Mary Holt is a recognised expert in medical screening and in underwriting travel insurance for people with medical conditions. You can read Mary's Q&As or ask Mary a question directly. Read Q&As Ask Mary

Last updated: 19th April 2017.